Why gender? / edited by Jude Browne, University of Cambridge.

By: Browne, JudeContributor(s): Browne, Jude, 1970- [editor.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2021Description: pages cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781108833370; 9781108970365Subject(s): Gender identity | Feminist theory | LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Ancient & Classical | LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Ancient & ClassicalAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Why gender?DDC classification: 305.3 LOC classification: HQ18.55 | .W49 2021Other classification: LCO003000 | LCO003000 Summary: "In this Chapter I consider how dangerous and disturbing the term "gender" has become in the minds of those who fear its power and influence . The stated concern about "gender" as a foreign term, an English term, acting on local or national cultures as if it were a foreign element or, indeed, a foreign power is matched by a presumption within feminist and LGBTIQ theory that "gender" can function as a generalizable concept no matter the language into which it enters. The aim of the following chapter is, thus, two-fold: one, to establish that there is no "gender theory" without a problem of translation, and that the fear of "gender" as a destructive cultural imposition from English (or from the Anglophone world) manifests a resistance to translation that deserves critical attention. As much as the resistance to cultural imperialism is surely warranted, so too is the resistance to forms of linguistic nationalism that seek to purify its language of foreign elements and the disturbance to syntactical ways of organizing the world that they can produce"-- Provided by publisher.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.
Donated by Prof. Bina Agarwal

"In this Chapter I consider how dangerous and disturbing the term "gender" has become in the minds of those who fear its power and influence . The stated concern about "gender" as a foreign term, an English term, acting on local or national cultures as if it were a foreign element or, indeed, a foreign power is matched by a presumption within feminist and LGBTIQ theory that "gender" can function as a generalizable concept no matter the language into which it enters. The aim of the following chapter is, thus, two-fold: one, to establish that there is no "gender theory" without a problem of translation, and that the fear of "gender" as a destructive cultural imposition from English (or from the Anglophone world) manifests a resistance to translation that deserves critical attention. As much as the resistance to cultural imperialism is surely warranted, so too is the resistance to forms of linguistic nationalism that seek to purify its language of foreign elements and the disturbance to syntactical ways of organizing the world that they can produce"-- Provided by publisher.

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